A low-key Latin Grammys generally avoids politics — but provides an impassioned J.Lo-Marc Anthony reunion. - Cloud2 News | No 1 People's Choice News Stream
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A low-key Latin Grammys generally avoids politics — but provides an impassioned J.Lo-Marc Anthony reunion.

 Marc Anthony and Jennifer LopezMarc Anthony and Jennifer LopezMarc Anthony and Jennifer LopezJulieta Venegas, left, with Diego Luna, who called on Latinos to fight discrimination.
For a long time running, the Latin Grammy Awards has offered high snapshots of political show.

In 2014, the broadcast was deferred by 20 minutes to show President Obama conveying a discourse on movement. Once the show took care of business, the politically disapproved of Puerto Rican band Calle 13 sang a stirring political song of devotion that finished with a show of support for the 43 vanished Mexican understudies from Ayotzinapa.

A year ago, the function included a vivacious execution of "Somos Más Americanos" (We Are More American) — a resistant tune about settler life — by the Mexican groups Los Tigres del Norte and Maná. Toward the end of the tune, the two groups held up a sign that read "Latinos Unidos No Voten Por Racistas" — or, "Latinos United, Don't Vote for Racists," a reference to Donald Trump's affirmations about Mexican migrants being offenders and "attackers."

So desires were high that the current year's honors, held Thursday night at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, would offer an energetic objection over Trump's decision to the administration — which has as of now prodded discuss mass extraditions and the development of an outskirt divider.

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Not really.

While the show commenced with a song of praise to resilience — Pablo Lopez and Juanes' hit two part harmony "Tu Enemigo" ("Your Enemy") — legislative issues were recognized on just a couple events, with some bland explanations about dividers.

It was performer Diego Luna, displaying the honor for tune of the year, who made the most pointed comments of the show: "I have a message for the greater part of the Latinos on this side of the outskirt: Together we can battle despise and segregation."

Julieta Venegas, left, with Diego Luna, who approached Latinos to battle separation.

Julieta Venegas, left, with Diego Luna, who approached Latinos to battle segregation. (Valeria Macon/AFP/Getty pictures)

The seventeenth Latin Grammys will probably be associated with the emotional laser-light-filled two part harmony between previous couple Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez.

To pay tribute to Marc Anthony's determination as the Latin Recording Academy's Person of the Year, the combine collaborated to sing the Abba-esque separation melody "Olvídame y Pega la Vuelta" ("Forget Me and Get Out of Here"), initially made well known by the Argentine twosome Pimpinela in the mid 1980s. (It merits viewing the first.)

From over the Latin Grammy stage, Lopez and Marc Anthony heaved lines, for example, "Overlook my eyes, my hands, my lips/on the grounds that they don't fancy you" and "Overlook everything, in light of the fact that here, you have a considerable measure of involvement." The execution was loaded with power, cleverness and enthusiasm — and each second of it was completely overwhelming.

Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez play out the Pimpinela tune "Olvídame y Pega la Vuelta" — about a separation.

Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez play out the Pimpinela tune "Olvídame y Pega la Vuelta" — about a separation. (Christopher Polk/Getty Images for LARAS)

Jennifer Lopez touches base at the seventeenth Latin Grammy Awards in Las Vegas.

Jennifer Lopez touches base at the seventeenth Latin Grammy Awards in Las Vegas. (Mike Nelson/EPA)
Jennifer Lopez arrives at the 17th Latin Grammy Awards in Las Vegas.
Lopez, who was decked out in a spangly unbalanced white number that flaunted a lot of leg, then gave Marc Anthony his Person of the Year grant, portraying him as a "living legend."

"He has given us works of art that will remain with us perpetually," she proceeded. "In our own and creative excursions, we have adapted so much, we have developed to such an extent. What's more, he will be such a large number of things throughout my life: My guide, my twin soul."

She then gave him a little kiss on the lips — to the thundering joy of the group.

Whatever is left of the show offered the standard-issue Latin Grammy combo of pop power songs sprinkled with Caribbean-arched jams — with a dash of society and Mexican provincial tossed in for flavor.

Pharrell Williams, left, with BIA and J Balvin performing "Safari" at the Latin Grammy Awards.

Pharrell Williams, left, with BIA and J Balvin performing "Safari" at the Latin Grammy Awards. (Chris Pizzello/Invision/Associated Press)

Chilean artist musician Mon Laferte with Colombian pop star Juanes, going with her on guitar.

Chilean artist musician Mon Laferte with Colombian pop star Juanes, going with her on guitar. (Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images)
Chilean singer-songwriter Mon Laferte with Colombian pop star Juanes, accompanying her on guitar.
Among the night's more prominent exhibitions was the version of the delightfully sluggish, hip-granulating reggaeton single "Safari" by J Balvin with Pharrell Williams, BIA and Sky. (BIA's rough vocals and solid stage nearness left me trusting I may see her all alone sooner or later soon.)

Chilean alterna-crooner Mon Laferte conveyed vitality to the trudging pace with her nation injected rockabilly tune, "Si Tu Me Quisieras" ("If You Loved Me"), while Norteño vocalist Gerardo Ortiz and Dominican star Prince Royce collaborated for an enchanting bachata called "Moneda" — a drawing in bit of musical cross-fertilization.

Furthermore, at the end of the broadcast, giving an appreciated relief from all the affection numbers, was a get the party started mixture by Argentine ska rockers Los Fabulosos Cadillacs, with lead artist Vicentico moving on his fantastic piano to convey his verses.

Be that as it may, the seventeenth Latin Grammys didn't offer an especially convincing dramatization when it went to the honors. This year, the principle pop and shake classifications were by and large ailing in star control. What's more, there were no compasses. Truth be told, the most any craftsman won was two honors.
Colombian vocalist Carlos Vives plays out his hit Grammy-winning tune "La Bicicleta."

Colombian vocalist Carlos Vives plays out his hit Grammy-winning tune "La Bicicleta." (Valeria Macon/AFP/Getty Images)

Los Fabulosos Cadillacs perform at the Latin Grammys.

Los Fabulosos Cadillacs perform at the Latin Grammys. (Chris Pizzello/Invision/Associated Press)

Colombian vocalist Carlos Vives brought home two trophies for his vallenato-tinged (and to some degree conventional) two part harmony with Shakira, "La Bicicleta." Reggaeton star Yandel additionally won two honors — for urban combination/execution and urban melody. What's more, Los Fabulosos Cadillacs, from Argentina, were respected with shake collection and shake tune.

Maybe most outstanding were artist musician Manuel Medrano's two wins — for best new craftsman and vocalist lyricist collection. The Colombian newcomer, who likewise performed on the broadcast, has a significant, ill humored voice that goes past the lovely kid pop that is regularly a most loved of the Latin Grammys.
 Individuals from Banda El Recodo de Cruz Lizarraga posture with their Latin Grammy for best banda collection.

Individuals from Banda El Recodo de Cruz Lizarraga posture with their Latin Grammy for best banda collection. (Mike Nelson/EPA)

Sibling sister twosome Jesse and Joy, who won the Latin Grammy for contemporary pop vocal collection.

Sibling sister team Jesse and Joy, who won the Latin Grammy for contemporary pop vocal collection. (Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images)

Additionally a victor was the late, dearest Mexican balladeer Juan Gabriel — who was the subject of a video montage out of appreciation for his life, yet inquisitively, no musical tributes. This was a missed open door, since Marc Anthony, who has perfectly translated some of Juan Gabriel's work previously, was in participation.
Pharrell Williams, left, with BIA and J Balvin performing "Safari" at the Latin Grammy Awards.
Generally speaking, the honors show was an average gathering — with some section commendable exhibitions and the remarkable theater of Lopez and Marc Anthony in front of an audience.

Be that as it may, given the increasing political atmosphere, it additionally felt somewhat like a missed open door. A little rebellion was all together. What we got was sayings.
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